HB 198 selection

 Standards Australia in conjunction with other stakeholders has produced the Handbook SA HB 198-2014 to provide a guidance for designers, specifiers, manufacturers and suppliers in accordance with AS 4586-2013 and AS 4663-2013. Guidance is provided on ‘deemed-to-satisfy’ provisions introduced in 2014 into the National Construction Code for a limited number of applications (such as stair treads, nosings and some ramps) that are required to be ‘slip resistant’. State and territory governments adopt or vary such provisions in their regulations when appropriate. Guidance is provided on the appropriate slip resistance of some common applications, the criteria for verifying compliance with slip resistance specifications, and the design for slip resistance of sloping surfaces. For a detailed understanding of that guide and the relevant we refer you to the particular documents.

We have prepared a selection of products that have been tested to meet the relevant characteristics described in HB198-2014. Please note that slip resistant tests are measured in laboratory conditions in accordance with the relavant Australian Standards and guidelines. Performance on site may vary.

HB198-2014 Table 3A: Minimum wet pendulum test or oil wet incling platform classificationsthat are deemed to satisfy the building applications in the National Construction Code NCC

Location Wet pendulum test Oil-wet inclining platform test Link to compliant products

Stair Treads and Stairway Landings in Buildings Covered by NCC Volumes One & Two

Stair treads and a stairway landing (when dry) P3 R10
Stair treads and a stairway landing (when wet) P4 R11

Nosings for Stair Treads and Stairway Landings in Buildings Covered by NCC Volumes One & Two

Dry stair tread, a stair non-skid nosing strip and a stairway
landing
P3
Wet stair tread, a stair non-skid nosing strip and a stairway
landing
P4

Ramps in Buildings Covered by NCC Volumes One and Two

Ramps not steeper than 1:14 gradient (when dry) P3 R10
Ramps not steeper than 1:14 gradient (when wet) P4 R11
Ramps steeper than 1:14 up but not steeper than 1:8 (when dry) P4 R11
Ramps steeper than 1:14 up but not steeper than 1:8 (when wet) P5 R12

NOTE: NCC compliance is demonstrated by achieving the values set out in this Table for either the wet pendulum test or the oil-wet inclining ramp test. It is not necessary to meet both criteria.

HB198-2014 Table 3B: Wet pendulum test or oil wet incling platform classifications for applications where the National Construction Code NCC does not require slip resistance

Location Wet pendulum test Oil-wet inclining platform test Link to compliant products

External Pavements and Ramps

External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths etc. steeper than 1 in 14 P5 R12
External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths, etc., under 1:14, external sales areas (e.g.markets), external carpark areas, external colonnades, walkways, pedestrian crossings, balconies, verandas, carports, driveways, courtyards and roof decks  P4 R11
Undercover car parks P3 R10

Hotels, Offices, Public Buildings, Schools and Kindergartens

Entries and access areas including hotels, offices, public buildings, schools, kindergartens, common areas of public buildings, internal lift lobbies
Wet areas P3 R10
Transitional area P2 R9
Dry area P1 (see Note 3) R9
Toilet facilities in offices, hotels and shopping centres  P3 R10
Hotel apartment bathrooms, en suites and toilets  P2 A
Hotel apartment kitchens and laundries  P2 R9

Supermarkets and Shopping Centres

Fast food outlets, buffet food servery areas, food courts and fast food dining areas in shopping centres  P3 R10
Shop and supermarket fresh fruit and vegetable areas  P3 R10
Shop entry areas with external entrances  P3 R10
Supermarket aisles (except fresh food areas)  P1 (see Note 3) R9
Other separate shops inside shopping centres—wet  P3 R10
Other separate shops inside shopping centres—dry  P1 (see Note 3) R9
Loading Docks, Commercial Kitchens, Cold Stores, Serving Areas Loading docks under cover and commercial kitchens 
Loading docks under cover and commercial kitchens P5 R12
Serving areas behind bars in public hotels and clubs, cold stores and freezers P4 R11

Swimming Pools and Sporting Facilities

Swimming pool ramps and stairs leading to water  P5 C
Swimming pool surrounds and communal shower rooms  P4 B
Communal changing rooms  P3 A
Undercover concourse areas of sports stadiums  P3 R10

Hospitals & Aged Care Facilities

Bathrooms and ensuites in hospitals and aged care facilities  P3 B
Wards and corridors in hospital and aged care facilities  P2 R9

Notes to Table 3B

  1. The slip resistances of pedestrian surface materials set out in Table 3B are intended as guidance in the context of design for pedestrian safety, taking account other factors including abnormal wear, maintenance, abnormal contamination, the presence (or otherwise) of water or other lubricants, the nature of the pedestrian traffic (including age, gait and crowding), the footwear (or lack thereof), slope, lighting and handrails.
  2. The contents of Table 3B are subject to further review by Committee BD-094, in its on going project to provide guidance on the specification and testing of slip resistance.
  3. The minimum classifications listed in Table 3B are P1 and R9. It is inappropriate for Table 3B to list the lower classification, P0, since there is no lower limit on Classification P0. Notwithstanding, some smooth and polished floor surfaces, which do not achieve Classification P1, may be considered to provide a safe walking environment for normal pedestrians walking at a moderate pace, provided the surfaces are kept clean and dry; however, should these surfaces become contaminated by either wet or dry materials, or be used by pedestrians in any other manner, then they may become unsafe. Therefore, the type of maintenance, the in-service inspection of floors, other environmental conditions and use should be taken in to account when selecting such products.
  4. When using the oil-wet inclining platform ‘R’ classifications, consideration should also be given to the determination and use of volumetric displacement ‘V’ classifications. In some cases, a specifier may choose either a particular combination of R and V values, or a more severe R value alone. For example, either R10 + V4, or R11. 

Slip hazard is affected by a large number of factors, including the slip resistance of a pedestrian surface material, its wear characteristics, maintenance and contamination, the presence (or otherwise) of water or other lubricants on the surface, in conjunction with the nature of the pedestrian traffic (including age, gait and crowding), the footwear (or lack thereof), slope and environment factors such as lighting and handrails. When specifying particular pedestrian surface materials, designers, specifiers and purchasers should also consider (in addition to the slip resistance) potential trip hazards, abrasion resistance, ability to be maintained and cleaned, permeability and the susceptibility to ponding water, and structural integrity of the material. Manufacturers and suppliers can provide information on some of these issues.

Given the complex interaction of factors affecting pedestrian slip, compliance with recommendations made herein will reduce certain pedestrian risks, but will not necessarily alleviate all hazards. The information provided in SA HB 198-2014 is intended for general guidance only and in no way replaces the services of professional consultants to carry out the design and specification of pedestrian surfaces.

External Pavements and Ramps


 

External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths etc. steeper than 1 in 14


 

External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths, etc., under
1:14, external sales areas (e.g. markets), external carpark areas, external colonnades, walkways, pedestrian crossings, balconies, verandas, carports, driveways, courtyards and roof decks
Undercover car parks

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